IranPresident Donald Trump has announced that he will approve certain sanctions waivers necessary in order to preserve the Iran nuclear deal (JCPOA). In an official statement, the President indicated that this is the last such waiver he will issue and warned that “the United States will not again waive sanctions in order to stay in the Iran nuclear deal.”

President Trump called on Congress to enact legislation addressing Iran and stated that the legislation should include the following critical components:

  • The legislation must require Iran to allow immediate inspections by international inspectors at all nuclear sites.
  • The legislation must “ensure that Iran never even comes close to possessing a nuclear weapon”.
  • The legislation “must have no expiration date.” President Trump stated that “My policy is to deny Iran all paths to a nuclear weapon – not just for ten years, but forever.”
  • The legislation must subject Iran’s long-range missile program to the same sanctions imposed on its nuclear weapons program.

Continue Reading President Trump Temporarily Extends Iran Nuclear Deal

White HouseOn Thursday, January 11, the U.S. Department of Commerce formally submitted to the President the results of its investigation into the effect of steel mill product imports on U.S. National Security. The President now has 90 days to decide on any action on steel imports. Continue Reading Commerce Submits Steel Section 232 Report to the President

drone with cameraOn Tuesday December 12, 2017, President Trump signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act (“NDAA”). Section 1092(d) of the NDAA restores the requirement that owners of unmanned aircraft systems (“UAS”) used for recreational purposes (“Model Aircraft”) must register and mark their UAS in accordance with the Federal Aviation Administration’s (“FAA”) “Registration and Marking Requirements for Small Unmanned Aircraft” published on December 16, 2015 (“Registration and Marking Requirements”).

Continue Reading National Defense Authorization Act Reinstates Marking and Registration Requirements for All UAS Owners

Globe showing AsiaThe U.S. Department of Commerce self-initiated trade cases for the first time since 1991 on Tuesday, November 28, on Chinese common alloy aluminum sheet. While Commerce normally opens antidumping and countervailing duty investigations only after requests from the domestic industry, the agency is authorized to self-initiate cases. Commerce last exercised this power for a countervailing duty case in 1991 and for an antidumping case in 1985.

Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement on Tuesday, “President Trump made it clear from day one that unfair trade practices will not be tolerated under this administration, and today, we take one more step in fulfilling that promise. We are self-initiating the first trade case in over a quarter century, showing once again that we stand in constant vigilance in support of free, fair and reciprocal trade.” Continue Reading Commerce Department Self-Initiates Trade Case on Aluminum Sheet from China

Charles MerrillHusch Blackwell’s Charlie Merrill authored an article, “It’s Up To EPA, Congress To Act On Commerce Reg Reforms” that appeared in Law360 this week. The article identifies recommendations for reform and actions needed for this reform to take place.

The U. S. Department of Commerce recently issued a report on the input it received from manufacturers on changes they would like to see in environmental permitting and regulations. The DOC report offered three overall recommendations for reducing regulatory burdens, as well as distilling recommendations from trade associations and individual manufacturing commenters into twelve “Priority Areas For Reform,” ten of them in the environmental area.

This article outlines environmental recommendations in the DOC report not previously analyzed in an earlier two-part Law360 article reporting on industry comments to the DOC, and discusses the processes by which the DOC’s priority recommendations for environmental regulations and permitting might be implemented.

Continue reading the article here.

Globe showing AsiaThe U.S. Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has amended its Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations (GTSR) in order to impose additional sanctions on Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) within the timeline required by the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA). Effective October 31, 2017, persons and entities that OFAC has designated as officials, agents, or affiliates of the IRGC remain subject to secondary blocking sanctions which continue to prohibit them from engaging in activity with US and non-US persons and, in addition, these amendments to the GTSR now impose new sanctions to prohibit the designated IRGC affiliates from receiving humanitarian donations and other forms of assistance. OFAC has provided a list of the IRGC affiliates subject to these amendments here. Continue Reading OFAC and State Department Update Iran and Russia Sanctions Under Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act

After undertaking a broader review of the United States’ policies with regard to Iran, President Donald Trump announced today that he will not certify the Iran nuclear deal, more commonly referred as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (“JCPOA”). This move stops short of unraveling the deal but allows Congress to consider the agreement for the next 60 days on an expedited basis in order to decide whether to re-impose sanctions lifted under the terms of the agreement. Continue Reading President Trump Declines Certification of Iran Nuclear Deal: What Does This Mean?

White HouseOn October, 6, the U.S. Department of State announced it will issue a report to President Donald Trump which will express the Department’s conclusion that the Government of Sudan (“GOS”) has sustained the positive actions necessary in order to repeal the majority of current U.S. economic sanctions against Sudan. The Department of State will formally publish a copy of this report in the Federal Register on Thursday, October 12, 2017, but has provided an advance copy on their website.

Continue Reading State Department and OFAC Announce Repeal of Sudan Sanctions

White HouseOn Thursday, September 21, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order imposing new sanctions on North Korea designed to curb its nuclear weapons program. President Trump, along with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, announced the sanctions at a United Nations luncheon.

The President said he had authorized the U.S. Department of Treasury to “target any individual or entity that conducts trade in goods, services or technology” with North Korea. The sanctions are also intended to disrupt shipping from North Korea by prohibiting aircraft and vessels that have been to North Korea within 180 days to call at a port or land in the United States.

Continue Reading Trump Announces New Sanctions on North Korea

International flagsThe Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) recently announced new sanctions on entities and individuals in Iran and Mexico. These sanctions were designated against individuals associated with Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (“the Quds Force”), Iranian entities involved in hacking against American financial institutions in 2011 and 2012, and Mexican businesses and individuals associated with drug trafficking.

Continue Reading OFAC Announces New Sanctions on Iran and Mexico