Yesterday, our Beau Jackson, Robert Stang and Linda Tiller joined manufacturers, distributors and service providers in Kansas City for a discussion about the impact of tariffs on the business community. This insightful program included economic, industry and legal perspectives on current trade conditions and the various implications of recently-imposed tariffs. Pictured at right, Beau

internationaltradeblog

In today’s trade climate, its imperative to stay abreast of changes that impact business. Keeping current can be a challenge for any company moving goods across borders.

Husch Blackwell’s International Trade & Supply Chain team is excited to launch a new resource for original insight. Our new blog provides timely and accurate information, drawing on

On Tuesday, September 18, 2018, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced a process for obtaining product exclusions from the 25% tariffs on certain products imported from China as a response to the Section 301 investigation on China’s trade practices.
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On August 29, 2018, President Trump issued proclamations announcing that companies will be able to request exclusions from the Section 232 quantitative limitations (i.e., quotas) for certain steel and aluminum products imported in to the United States.  In particular, this affects steel and aluminum imports from Argentina, Brazil, and South Korea.
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North America MapAfter President Trump announced steel and aluminum tariffs on several of the country’s allies in March 2018, a number of EU countries, Mexico, and Canada immediately announced retaliatory tariffs against American products. Other trade partners and allies have also made plans to seek remedies through the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the World

On August 7, 2018, the Office of the United States Trade Representative announced the second list of products that will be subject to an additional 25 percent tariff when imported from China.   After a public hearing and comment period, USTR ultimately only removed 5 tariff lines from the list proposed in its notice of June

Globe showing Asia

As previously reported, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) issued a notice proposing an additional 10 percent tariff on approximately 6,000 8-digit tariff codes estimated to cover approximately $200 billion worth of imports from China. Our blog post can be found here and the list of products can be found here.

Globe showing Asia

On Friday, July 6, 2018, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced a process for obtaining product exclusions from the 25% tariffs imposed on certain products imported from China.  The tariffs went into effect on July 6, 2018.

USTR has set the following deadlines:

  • All product exclusion requests must be filed by October

On June 27, 2018, the U.S. Department of  Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) officially revoked General Licenses H and I.  General License H previously allowed foreign owned or controlled subsidiaries of U.S. companies to engage in limited transactions with Iran that would have otherwise been prohibited under the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations (the “ITSR”).  General License I previously allowed U.S. persons to negotiate and enter into contingent contracts for exports and reexports to Iran of commercial passenger aircraft and related parts and services that were eligible to potentially receive specific licenses under the Iran Nuclear Deal, otherwise known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (the “JCPOA”).  OFAC previously advised that these revocations would be forthcoming in May, when President Trump formally announced his decision to withdraw from the JCPOA.
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