On Saturday, December 1, 2018, President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping met to discuss trade relations between the two countries. Following their meeting, President Trump indicated that he would postpone increasing the tariff rate to 25% on certain Chinese goods worth up to $200 billion currently covered under Section 301 List 3. This increase was originally slated for January 1, 2019 (see our previous post here).  The 10% duties on that $200 million in goods will remain in effect, however, as will the 25% tariffs on the goods worth about $50 billion, which appear on the first and second list of additional duties. According to the White House press statement, the parties agreed to “endeavor” on a 90-day period, until March 1, 2019, to discuss the restructuring of China’s trade policies and come to an agreement. Continue Reading President Trump Holds Off on Increase of Section 301 Tariffs

On October 11, 2018, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced that it is initiating antidumping duty investigations on Refillable Stainless Steel Kegs from Germany, Mexico, and the People’s Republic of China and concurrently initiating a countervailing duty investigation on imports from China. Continue Reading Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations: Refillable Stainless Steel Kegs from Germany, Mexico, and China

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On Monday, September 17, 2018, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) finalized and released the list of  imported products from China  (approximately $200 billion)  for which additional tariffs are to be collected.  According to President Trump, the initial tariffs will take effect on September 24, 2018 at a rate of 10 percent.  At the direction of the President, he has instructed the USTR to, “increase the level of trade covered by the additional duties in order to obtain elimination of China’s unfair policies.”  Subsequently starting on January 1, 2019 this will increase to 25 percent. Continue Reading New Section 301 Tariffs Released with Few Exemptions Granted

On August 7, 2018, the Office of the United States Trade Representative announced the second list of products that will be subject to an additional 25 percent tariff when imported from China.   After a public hearing and comment period, USTR ultimately only removed 5 tariff lines from the list proposed in its notice of June 20, 2018.

The final list can be found here.   The additional tariff will go into effect on August 23.   USTR will publish a Federal Register notice shortly which will include a process by which parties can request exclusions for particular products.    This product exclusion process is expected to be similar to the process announced after the first round of tariff increases. See our blog post here.

For additional information, please contact Robert StangStephen BrophyNithya Nagarajan, Beau Jackson, or Jeffrey S. Neeley.

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As previously reported, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) issued a notice proposing an additional 10 percent tariff on approximately 6,000 8-digit tariff codes estimated to cover approximately $200 billion worth of imports from China. Our blog post can be found here and the list of products can be found here.

On August 1, 2018, the President directed USTR to consider increasing the proposed tariff rate from 10 percent to 25 percent for products on the proposed list.  As a result, USTR extended the timeline for public comment on the proposed product list:

  • August 13, 2018: The due date for filing requests to appear and a summary of expected testimony at the public hearing and for filing pre-hearing submissions has been extended from July 27 to August 13, 2018.
  • September 6, 2018: The due date for submission of written comments has been extended from August 17 to September 6, 2018.
  • September 6, 2018: The due date for submission of post-hearing rebuttal comments has been extended from August 30 to September 6, 2018.

The hearing is still scheduled to take place from August 20-23, 2018.

For additional information, please contact Robert StangStephen BrophyNithya Nagarajan, or Jeffrey S. Neeley.

The U.S. Trade Representative is proposing an additional 10 percent tariff on approximately 6,000 8-digit tariff codes estimated to be about $200 billion worth of imports.  The USTR has now set a third set of hearing and written submissions for those affected by this new set of proposed tariffs.  The schedule is as follows:

July 27:  Deadline for filing notice of appearance to testify at hearing

August 17:  Written Comments Due

August 20-23: Public Hearings Scheduled

August 30:  Post-Hearing Comments Due

Senior government officials said a decision on the tariffs will be made sometime after August 30.

The notice posted at USTR after close of business July 10 says that staff took into account impacts on consumers, and analysts removed some tariff lines because they were “likely to cause disruptions to the U.S. economy, as well as tariff lines subject to legal or administrative constraints.” Food, chemicals, pesticides, minerals, fabrics, construction materials, handbags, luggage, car parts, appliances, machines, televisions, items made from steel and aluminum, batteries, semiconductor assemblies, furniture and more were on the list. Pharmaceuticals of Chapter 30, and apparel and footwear of Chapters 61-64, were not.

USTR is proposing the tariffs because China has not acquiesced to U.S. demands after initial Section 301 tariffs set at 25 percent on $34 billion in Chinese goods.

For additional information, please contact Stephen Brophy, Nithya Nagarajan, or Jeffrey S. Neeley.

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On Friday, June 15, 2018, President Trump announced that the US would be imposing a 25% tariff on Chinese technology imports. The tariffs were originally proposed on March 22, 2018 as a result of a Section 301 investigation of China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation. See our original post here.

Tariffs will be imposed on certain products starting on July 6, 2018.  Those products are listed here and consist of a subset of the products proposed on March 22.  Continue Reading President Trump Announces Tariffs on Chinese Technology Imports

Nowadays, the only thing that remains certain in the industry of domestic and global trade is the unpredictability of influential decisions made by the U.S. government and how those decisions will impact trading laws and regulations.

There has been much to say regarding Section 232 and related tariff concerns. On Husch Blackwell’s TMT Industry Insider you can find several blog posts we’ve published regarding these hot-button topics.

Additionally, Husch Blackwell is pleased to offer complimentary passes to the first 30 registrants for a very timely upcoming webinar: Trump’s Steel and Aluminum Tariffs: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.

The webinar will focus on Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs and provide insight on what lies ahead. It will be hosted on The Knowledge Group and will take place on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at 12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. (ET) The webinar is led by Husch Blackwell Partner, Nithya Nagarajan and John Peterson, Partner at Neville Peterson LLP.

Register here.