Stainless steel factoryOn April 30, 2018, the President issued two new Proclamations regarding the 232 tariffs imposed on imports of steel and aluminum articles into the United States.  The new Proclamations modify the previous steel and aluminum Proclamations with respect to imports from Canada, Mexico, the European Union, Argentina, Australia, Brazil and South Korea.

Continue Reading President Continues 232 Exemptions for Certain Countries, Announces Quota on Imports of Steel from South Korea

Stainless steel factoryCountry Exemptions

On March 22, 2018, the President issued new Proclamations temporarily exempting imports from certain countries from the steel and aluminum tariffs that were announced in Proclamations 9704 and 9705 of March 8, 2018. The President had previously exempted imports from Canada and Mexico and the new Proclamations add exemptions for imports from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, European Union member countries, and South Korea. However, the Proclamations make clear that the exemptions, including the exemptions for Canada and Mexico, are temporary and that tariffs will go into effect on imports from an exempted country on May 1, 2018 unless the country has reached an agreement with the United States on an alternative means to remove the threat to national security posed by imports of steel articles from the country. If any agreements are reached and any countries are exempted on a long term basis, the President will consider adjustments to the tariff level imposed on non-exempt countries.

In the meantime, the President may consider quotas on imports from exempt countries. If a quota is imposed, the quota amount imposed will take into account all imports of steel and aluminum since January 1, 2018.

While the country exemptions may extend beyond May 1, depending on the progress on trade negotiations, there is no guarantee of such extensions.


Continue Reading President Exempts Countries from Steel and Aluminum Tariffs, Makes Product Exclusions Retroactive

Stainless steel factoryThe recent announcement by the White House that it intends to unilaterally impose 25 percent tariffs on steel imports and 10 percent tariffs on aluminum imports from all countries except Canada and Mexico has created significant uncertainty among foreign exporters.

It is of great import that Canada and Mexico are excluded from the imposition of section 232 duties for the time being. The European Union, Australia and South Korea have expressed a desire for similar exclusions to be applied to them. In fact, the EU and Australia are almost assured of an exemption based upon press reports. But where does that leave other important allies such as Turkey, India, Brazil and a host of other steel-exporting nations?


Continue Reading Can U.S. Allies Sidestep New Steel and Aluminum Tariffs?

compassOn March 8, 2014 Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, a Boeing 777, departed Kuala Lumpur for Beijing with 239 passengers and crew on board. As it left Malaysian airspace the pilot, 53-year old Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, said, “Good night, Malaysian 370” to controllers. One minute later its transponder signal disappeared from radar screens. No further communications with the aircraft occurred. Malaysian radar showed that that the plane reversed course and flew southwest across Malaysia for half an hour. It reached the west coast of Malaysia, turned northwest, and continued on that course for another half hour before radar contact was finally lost.

Continue Reading Air Safety: Malaysia Air Flight 370: The Final Report

shipping containersOn March 8, 2017, Petitioners Globe Specialty Metals, Inc. filed a petition for the imposition of antidumping duties and countervailing duties on imports of Silicon Metal from Australia, Brazil, Kazakhstan, and Norway.

SCOPE OF THE INVESTIGATION

The scope of these investigations covers all forms and sizes of silicon metal, including silicon metal powder. Silicon metal contains at least 85.00 percent but less than 99.99 percent silicon, and less than 4.00 percent iron, by actual weight. Semiconductor grade silicon (merchandise containing at least 99.99 percent silicon by actual weight and classifiable under HTSUS subheading 2804.61.0000) is excluded from the scope of these investigations.

Silicon metal is currently classifiable under subheadings 2804.69.1000 and 2804.69.5000 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”). While the HTSUS numbers are provided for convenience and customs purposes, the written description of the scope remains dispositive.


Continue Reading Petition Summary: Silicon Metal From Australia, Brazil, Kazakhstan, And Norway