International Trade & Supply Chain

On November 9, 2018, the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) extended the expiration date for certain Ukraine-related general licenses related to EN+ Group plc (EN+), United Company RUSAL PLC (RUSAL), and GAZ Group (GAZ).  The expiration date of General Licenses 13G (Authorizing Certain Transactions Necessary to Divest or Transfer Debt, Equity, or Other Holdings in Certain Blocked Persons), 14C (Authorizing Certain Activities Necessary to Maintenance or Wind Down of Operations or Existing Contracts with United Company RUSAL PLC), 15B (Authorizing Certain Activities Necessary to Maintenance or Wind Down of Operations or Existing Contracts with GAZ Group), and 16C (Authorizing Certain Activities Necessary to Maintenance or Wind Down of Operations or Existing Contracts with EN+ Group PLC or JSC EuroSibEnergo) was extended from December 12, 2018 to January 7, 2019.  U.S. persons participating in transactions or activities authorized by these general licenses should provide a detailed report to OFAC within 10 business days of January 7, 2019 (by January 21, 2019).

Continue Reading OFAC Extends Expiration Date for EN+, RUSAL, and GAZ Ukraine-related General Licenses

Iran

On November 5, 2018, the United States fully reimposed sanctions against Iran as part of its decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal, also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (“JCPOA”).  President Trump announced the decision to withdraw on May 8, 2018, thus beginning the “wind-down” period for businesses to withdraw from Iran.  Continue Reading U.S. Reimposes Tough Sanctions on Iran; More Designations to Come

 

On October 19, 2018, the U.S. International Trade Commission made affirmative determinations in the preliminary phase of the antidumping duty investigations on Strontium Chromate from Austria and France.
Continue Reading The USITC Reaches a Unanimous Preliminary Injury Determination in Strontium Chromate from Austria and France

cargo shipOn October 18, 2018, Petitioners Unifi Manufacturing, Inc. and Nan Ya Plastics Corporation, America filed a petition for the imposition of antidumping and countervailing duties on imports of Polyester Textured Yarn from the People’s Republic of China and India. Continue Reading Petition Summary: Polyester Textured Yarn from China and India

On October 11, 2018, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced that it is initiating antidumping duty investigations on Refillable Stainless Steel Kegs from Germany, Mexico, and the People’s Republic of China and concurrently initiating a countervailing duty investigation on imports from China. Continue Reading Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations: Refillable Stainless Steel Kegs from Germany, Mexico, and China

shipping containers

On September 22, 2018, Bill (SB-1402) was signed into law in California to become effective January 1, 2019. That law will make a “Customer” that engages or uses “a port drayage motor carrier” jointly and severally liable with that port drayage motor carrier if that carrier is listed on the Internet Web site maintained by the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement. This ominous list will identify port drayage motor carriers which have been found liable to a “port drayage driver” for unsatisfied court judgments, assessments, orders, decisions, or awards, for port drayage services performed for which the drivers have not been paid or expenses for which they have not been reimbursed, plus damages, penalties, and interest.

The reason why this Bill is not as tentative as it sounds is that The California Labor Commissioner’s Office, Division of Labor Standards Enforcement, has awarded in excess of $45 million in unlawful deductions from wages and out-of-pocket expenses to more than 400 drivers, and that drivers have seen little of those awards. Continue Reading Shippers, NVOCCs, Ocean Carriers, And Other Port Players to Be Liable to Port Drayage Drivers Under New California Legislation Effective January 1, 2019

globe charts graphsCongratulations! You have developed or launched an innovative new product or service, and your business dreams are becoming a reality. It’s all very exciting.  One thing you may not have considered much, however, is whether your innovations or brand are susceptible to infringement in the international context. Will competitors try to make a knock-off product or steal your trade secrets? Are foreign companies going to ship infringing articles to the U.S. market? Protecting your intellectual property (IP) is key. Here are some fundamental suggestions to thwart such threats to your growing business. Continue Reading International IP Issues for Startups