The U.S. Trade Representative is proposing an additional 10 percent tariff on approximately 6,000 8-digit tariff codes estimated to be about $200 billion worth of imports.  The USTR has now set a third set of hearing and written submissions for those affected by this new set of proposed tariffs.  The schedule is as follows:

July 27:  Deadline for filing notice of appearance to testify at hearing

August 17:  Written Comments Due

August 20-23: Public Hearings Scheduled

August 30:  Post-Hearing Comments Due

Senior government officials said a decision on the tariffs will be made sometime after August 30.

The notice posted at USTR after close of business July 10 says that staff took into account impacts on consumers, and analysts removed some tariff lines because they were “likely to cause disruptions to the U.S. economy, as well as tariff lines subject to legal or administrative constraints.” Food, chemicals, pesticides, minerals, fabrics, construction materials, handbags, luggage, car parts, appliances, machines, televisions, items made from steel and aluminum, batteries, semiconductor assemblies, furniture and more were on the list. Pharmaceuticals of Chapter 30, and apparel and footwear of Chapters 61-64, were not.

USTR is proposing the tariffs because China has not acquiesced to U.S. demands after initial Section 301 tariffs set at 25 percent on $34 billion in Chinese goods.

For additional information, please contact Stephen Brophy, Nithya Nagarajan, or Jeffrey S. Neeley.

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Photo of Nithya Nagarajan Nithya Nagarajan

Nithya’s extensive background in U.S. trade issues spans 25 years and includes various roles in a number of federal government agencies, including the Department of Commerce Department of Justice, and the U.S. Court of International Trade. She assists clients with administrative and regulatory…

Nithya’s extensive background in U.S. trade issues spans 25 years and includes various roles in a number of federal government agencies, including the Department of Commerce Department of Justice, and the U.S. Court of International Trade. She assists clients with administrative and regulatory actions before the Department of Commerce, International Trade Commission and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and defends clients in appeals before the Court of International Trade, Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, NAFTA panels and the World Trade Organization. In addition to her body of U.S. experience, Nithya is also well-versed in international trade issues in China and India.

Photo of Jeffrey Neeley Jeffrey Neeley

Jeffrey has more than 25 years of experience representing private parties in international trade remedies disputes in the U.S. and in foreign jurisdictions. He guides clients in matters including antidumping investigations, countervailing duties, subsidies, intellectual property disputes as well as related customs, export…

Jeffrey has more than 25 years of experience representing private parties in international trade remedies disputes in the U.S. and in foreign jurisdictions. He guides clients in matters including antidumping investigations, countervailing duties, subsidies, intellectual property disputes as well as related customs, export control, and other import/export issues.