International flagsThe Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) recently announced new sanctions on entities and individuals in Iran and Mexico. These sanctions were designated against individuals associated with Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (“the Quds Force”), Iranian entities involved in hacking against American financial institutions in 2011 and 2012, and Mexican businesses and individuals associated with drug trafficking.

Continue Reading OFAC Announces New Sanctions on Iran and Mexico

Social media cubesIt seems like we hear about a new data breach every week. Thanks to one of the most recent breaches, you could be only ten dollars away from getting in touch with your favorite A-list celebrity. Instagram — the Facebook-owned photo sharing company — was recently hacked due to a flaw in the program. Most recent reports indicate up to six million Instagram users’ email addresses and phone numbers may have been made public due to the data breach.

While the breach initially appeared to affect only celebrities and verified accounts, it has now been shown to affect a much wider range of accounts.

Continue Reading Instagram Hacked: What to Do to Protect Yourself in an Age of Data Breaches

data securityYou are an entrepreneur. You have great ideas. Those ideas are going to change your industry. In most cases, to accomplish those goals, you are going to need help from others. How do you protect your intellectual property and data? You need to focus on protecting those assets in the contracting process.

Most developing companies rely on third party service providers. As an entrepreneur, you will likely rely on hosting and cloud solutions. While we advise that you consider business considerations first, you should also consider legal issues relating to data privacy and security issues. You cannot achieve 100% security for your assets, but there are many ways to protect yourself. You should also consider obtaining cyber-liability insurance for your company and you should ask your service providers whether they have it.

Continue Reading Protecting Your Data and Intellectual Property

White HouseToday, President Trump officially signed H.R. 3364, the “Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act” (CAATSA) into law. CAATSA originated as a bill which was focused on only Iran. However, partially in response to Russian cyber-interference with the 2016 election, the Senate expanded CAATSA to impose additional sanctions against Russia and also codify into law various sanctions imposed by the Obama Administration in the form of Executive Orders. The House of Representatives then approved these additions and added further sanctions against North Korea. Eventually, the House and Senate approved the final version of CAATSA by a margin of 419-3 and 98-2, respectively. For additional detail on CAATSA’s legislative history, please see our previous alerts here, here and here.

Continue Reading President Signs Russian, Iran and North Korea Sanctions Legislation into Law

Data computerData security breaches are impacting long-standing and start-up corporations, as well as public and private entities. No one is immune from these threats and understanding the prevalence is the first step in best preventing this from impacting your organization.

Continue Reading Gone Phishing: Data Security Breaches Affect Start-Ups and School Districts Alike

globe AsiaOn Thursday, June 15, 2017, by a vote of 98-2, the U.S. Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill that would potentially impose additional sanctions against Russia and give Congress the power to delay and/or prevent any action by President Trump to lift or relax sanctions against Russia. Tentatively titled the “Countering Russian Influence in Europe and Eurasia Act of 2017” (“CRIEEA”), the bill must now proceed to the U.S. House of Representatives for further deliberation and approval.

Continue Reading Senate Passes Potential Russian Sanctions Bill

Is your company prepared for a potential ransomware attack? Ransomware is a type of malicious software feared most by corporate boards and IT departments as it could completely shut down an entire network of computers and compromise large amounts of critical and sensitive data. In a post on Husch Blackwell’s Byte Back blog, Mindi Giftos provides simple yet important steps companies should take to prepare for and minimize the risk of a cyber attack.

Shanghai ChinaThe newly passed Cybersecurity Law of the People’s Republic of China will take effect in June 2017, and it is expected to have a significant impact on multinationals doing business in mainland China. The law affects both domestic and foreign companies operating on the Chinese mainland and covers a wide range of activities including the use of the internet, information and communications technologies, personal data, national security and more.

The difficulties with determining the steps needed to comply with such sweeping changes are only complicated by the fact that a large number of key terms in the law have yet to be clearly defined. As a result, China’s new Cybersecurity Law will continue to evolve as the national government interprets it.

Here are some key provisions to follow in the coming months.

Continue Reading Costs and Unanswered Questions of China’s New Cybersecurity Regime

swing sunset loveAny agreement between two parties begins with the rosy optimism that the good times will last forever. In the world of technology licensing and development, however, we know this is rarely the case. While this blog has previously considered data security oversight by the board of directors of the company, it is also important for a company’s legal and procurement teams to establish a plan for the security, use, and transition of its data throughout the contracting process. These issues are particularly important in highly regulated industries such as healthcare and financial services.

While there are many types of data issues that a company may need to address in any contract negotiation, our team has found that the following issues require consideration in nearly every technology licensing and development agreement.

Read the full list on our Byte Back blog.

Data LocksThe European Union and United States differ greatly on law regulating the collection and transfer of personal data. For many years companies could rely upon the U.S.–EU Safe Harbor to lawfully make transatlantic data transfers and bridge the gap between the differing privacy frameworks. But in October 2015, the EU Court of Justice invalidated the U.S.–EU Safe Harbor on the grounds that it did not adequately protect personal data. This ruling jeopardized the continued flow of data from the EU to the United States and left many companies wondering how they could continue collecting and using data from the EU without violating the law.

Husch Blackwell Partner Mindi Giftos covered this topic in further detail on the InBusiness website. Click here to read more.